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Physical Therapy - Dallas

Physical therapy research guide for TWU Dallas students, faculty, and staff.

Congratulations!

You are getting close to graduation, which you have been working toward for some time. Be aware that when you graduate, you won't have the same access to resources through TWU Libraries, but there are still plenty of ways to find reputable resources.

Be Our Guest

Other local universities often have similar access through TexShare. Check their library websites for how to apply for a guest account and what you can access with one.

Public Libraries

Public libraries in the state of Texas offer important TexShare databases that professionals will find useful. Check your local public library website to see which of the TexShare databases your local library provides.

Your local library will have information concerning who can get a library card and how to apply for one. Check the website carefully. 

Hospital & Clinic Libraries

Hospitals provide library services to their professional staff, even if they are not labeled as a library (i.e., Resource Centers, Learning Centers, Research Services, etc.). 

Examples of local medical libraries:

Free Resources

Explore the following links to find free full text journal articles straight from the publishers.

Open Educational Resources (OERs) are teaching, learning, and research materials that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation, and redistribution by others with no or limited restrictions.

Many business ventures seek your commitment to be a presenter at conferences or agree to write papers for their journals, when their journals (or conferences) are nonexistent. Carefully research places to publish, using your public library resources. Once you know where and how you want to get published, be careful to work with only the best quality publishers who will make your work shine!

Publishing Guides from TWU Libraries & Elsewhere

Predatory Journals

It can be difficult to identify valid, peer-reviewed, authoritative journals in the mass of publications popping up. Appeals to potential authors from some journals that appear to be scholarly, valid research journals may not be. Be careful. Research could reveal that the appeals may actually be predatory publishers looking to make a quick buck. Please investigate to be sure the journal is legitimate, or ask a librarian for help to investigate the authenticity of a journal before agreeing to publish in it. Learn more in this guide's page on Predatory Publishers, linked to at the left.